Archive for the ‘Professional’ Category

I am pleased to announce this 1.4.0 release of Tawny-OWL. It is with some surprise that I find that it is about 8 months since the last release, which is indicative of the relatively stable state of Tawny.

The main addition to this release has been further support for patterns, which now include what I am calling “facets”, as well as some general functions for grouping the entities created using a pattern with annotations. I have had a lot of discussion about the implementation of this feature and that it should be useful in practice.

The main motivation behind making this release now is the development of a Tawny Tutorial for ICBO 2015. The features are stable for the release are stable, so the release has not been rushed out the door, but I wanted to use them in the tutorial as they really simplify some aspects.

Tawny-OWL 1.4.0 is now available on Clojars.

While I have been working on a manual called Take Wing for Tawny-OWL (http://www.russet.org.uk/blog/3030) for some time, it is far from finished. In the meantime, I am giving a tutorial at this years ICBO, and the slides for this are now relatively advanced, although I have a few more sections and some checking to do. The full tutorial is available (http://github.com/phillord/tawny-tutorial), and I think it offers are fairly comprehensive guide to basic Tawny-OWL usage.

I am fairly pleased with the tutorial as it stands. It is written up as a semantic document using my lentic package (http://www.russet.org.uk/blog/3047) which seems to be working well (although I discovered a few bugs with the asciidoc support in the course of writing the tutorial!).

For anyone who is thinking of coming, the pre-requisities for the tutorial are now online. I am planning to do a large part of the tutorial in a “follow-my-leader” fashion; it’s always difficult to predict the state of the networks at these events, so it would help significantly if at least some of the people coming could work through this short document before hand.

Bibliography


Abstract

Bio-medical ontologies can contain a large number of concepts. Often many of these concepts are very similar to each other, and similar or identical to concepts found in other bio-medical databases. This presents both a challenge and opportunity: maintaining many similar concepts is tedious and fastidious work, which could be substantially reduced if the data could be derived from pre-existing knowledge sources. In this paper, we describe how we have achieved this for an ontology of the mitochondria using our novel ontology development environment, the Tawny-OWL library.

  • Jennifer D. Warrender
  • Phillip Lord

Plain English Summary

Ontologies allow complex descriptions of the world in a way that is both precise and computationally amenable — that is, computers can be used to check and query these descriptions. The mitochondria is a critical part of the cells of most organisms, being responsible for energy usage. We wished to build an ontology describing the current research on the mitochondria.

The more traditional approach to this, would have been to build the ontology from scratch; but many parts of the mitochondria, including the genes and proteins have already been described in other databases. Building from scratch on the basis of the data in these databases would be time-consuming, but also sensitive to change — if the database changes, our ontology would need updating too.

Instead we have used our new ontology development methodology to automatically extract this knowledge, and build the ontology for us providing what we describe as the scaffold for an ontology. In future, we will add more knowledge to this ontology, slowing building up the rich description of the mitochondrion that we are aiming for.


Abstract

Ontology development relates to software development in that they both involve the production of formal computational knowledge. It is possible, therefore, that some of the techniques used in software engineering could also be used for ontologies; for example, in software engineering testing is a well-established process, and part of many different methodologies. The application of testing to ontologies, therefore, seems attractive. The Karyotype Ontology is developed using the novel Tawny-OWL library. This provides a fully programmatic environment for ontology development, which includes a complete test harness. In this paper, we describe how we have used this harness to build an extensive series of tests as well as used a commodity continuous integration system to link testing deeply into our development process; this environment, is applicable to any OWL ontology whether written using Tawny-OWL or not. Moreover, we present a novel analysis of our tests, introducing a new classification of what our different tests are. For each class of test, we describe why we use these tests, also by comparison to software tests. We believe that this systematic comparison between ontology and software development will help us move to a more agile form of ontology development.

  • Jennifer D. Warrender
  • Phillip Lord

Plain English Summary

Ontologies are a mechanism for representing parts of the world computationally. They allow you to describe the world in a complex way, and then query over it repeatable and consistently. However, ontologies are complex and are themselves hard to build consistently and repeatably. If the ontology is built incorrectly, then queries will give the wrong answers also.

Software is also complex and over the years, software engineers have developed many techniques for building software so that it, too, is correct. While these do not always succeed, they have allowed us to produce software that is vastly more complex than in years past. One important technique is automated testing. Here software can be run to ensure that it is behaving correctly automatically and often. To do this, we use one piece of software to test another.

We have borrowed the same technology for use with ontologies; while this has been done before, our use of commodity testing software has allowed us to scale up the tests significantly, and we describe this approach in this paper. However, while they have many similarities, ontologies are not software. The sort of tests that we need for ontologies may be different from those that we need for software. In this paper, we also describe the kinds of tests that we have used for the karyotype ontology (1305.3758), and which are probably relevant to other ontology development efforts too.

Overall, this should increase our understanding of how to build ontology tests and ontologies.

Bibliography

Lentic is a package which implements lenticular text — two Emacs buffers that contain the same content, but are otherwise independent. Unlike indirect-buffers, which must contain absolutely identical strings, lentic buffers can contain different text, with a transformation between the two.

It was not my original plan to have another release so soon after the last release (http://www.russet.org.uk/blog/3068). However, the work that I had planned for that release turned out to be very-straightforward.

For this release, introduces a new form of buffer which is an unmatched block buffer. The details do not matter — the practical upshot is that with, for example, org-mode it is now possible to have more than one style of source block. In my examples directory, I have an org-mode file with “hello world” in three different languages (Clojure, Python and Emacs-Lisp). When lentic, you get four views, each in a different mode, and syntactically correct. Not a use I think I would suggest, but a nice demonstration.

Lentic is now available on MELPA, MELPA stable and github.

Bibliography

Lentic is a package which implements lenticular text — two Emacs buffers that contain the same content, but are otherwise independent. Unlike indirect-buffers, which must contain absolutely identical strings, lentic buffers can contain different text, with a transformation between the two.

This has several uses. Firstly, it allows a form of multi-modal editing, where each lentic buffer shows the text in a different mode. For example, this can be used to edit literate Haskell code. This should work with indirect-buffers, but in practice does not because the buffers share text-properties. These are a feature of the buffer strings in Emacs, and are used by some modes for their functionality; when two modes work on the same string, each tends to reset the text properties of the other.

It is possible to take this form of multi-modal editing further, where the different buffers contain different syntax. So, for example, one buffer might be in fully valid Emacs-Lisp, while the other might be a fully-valid org-mode buffer. This allows a literate programming technique even without specific support for this form of programming in the language. Taken to the extreme, it is even possible for the buffers to contain completely different strings; I have not found a good practical use for the extreme yet, but lentic now supports a rot-13 transformation which demonstrates its capabilities.

Lentic can also be used to create persistant views of the same text. For example, lentic could be used to maintain a view of the imports of a java file, or the namespace form in clojure, or the preamble of a latex document. Unlike a second window, this view persists even if it is not visible. Alternatively, one view could use very small text, and the other could contain larger text, allowing rapid navigation.

Lentic 0.8 contains a number of new features since the 0.7 [release] (http://www.russet.org.uk/blog/3047). The biggest change is that it is possible to produce any number of lentic buffers, rather than just two as previously. This means that its multi-modal and persistant view capabilities can be used at the same time.

Lentic is now available on MELPA, MELPA stable and github.

Bibliography