Abstract

Ontology development relates to software development in that they both involve the production of formal computational knowledge. It is possible, therefore, that some of the techniques used in software engineering could also be used for ontologies; for example, in software engineering testing is a well-established process, and part of many different methodologies. The application of testing to ontologies, therefore, seems attractive. The Karyotype Ontology is developed using the novel Tawny-OWL library. This provides a fully programmatic environment for ontology development, which includes a complete test harness. In this paper, we describe how we have used this harness to build an extensive series of tests as well as used a commodity continuous integration system to link testing deeply into our development process; this environment, is applicable to any OWL ontology whether written using Tawny-OWL or not. Moreover, we present a novel analysis of our tests, introducing a new classification of what our different tests are. For each class of test, we describe why we use these tests, also by comparison to software tests. We believe that this systematic comparison between ontology and software development will help us move to a more agile form of ontology development.

  • Jennifer D. Warrender
  • Phillip Lord


Plain English Summary

Ontologies are a mechanism for representing parts of the world computationally. They allow you to describe the world in a complex way, and then query over it repeatable and consistently. However, ontologies are complex and are themselves hard to build consistently and repeatably. If the ontology is built incorrectly, then queries will give the wrong answers also.

Software is also complex and over the years, software engineers have developed many techniques for building software so that it, too, is correct. While these do not always succeed, they have allowed us to produce software that is vastly more complex than in years past. One important technique is automated testing. Here software can be run to ensure that it is behaving correctly automatically and often. To do this, we use one piece of software to test another.

We have borrowed the same technology for use with ontologies; while this has been done before, our use of commodity testing software has allowed us to scale up the tests significantly, and we describe this approach in this paper. However, while they have many similarities, ontologies are not software. The sort of tests that we need for ontologies may be different from those that we need for software. In this paper, we also describe the kinds of tests that we have used for the karyotype ontology (1305.3758), and which are probably relevant to other ontology development efforts too.

Overall, this should increase our understanding of how to build ontology tests and ontologies.

Bibliography

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